“An informal, friendly place to stroll through, peer into shop windows, chat with friends, lounge in pubs or sit in the sun”

What happened to Gordon Logie’s vision for the Lion Yard of 1965? Mike Petty spotted a very interesting article in the Cambridgeshire Collection which has a very interesting picture of the model of what we did not get. Above from the Cambridge Daily News here. Some of you may have spotted the Guildhall and the … More “An informal, friendly place to stroll through, peer into shop windows, chat with friends, lounge in pubs or sit in the sun”

What should the role of local historians be in the local planning process?

Because if expensive consultants get things wrong, the impact on future plans could be significant. It stems from this. You can read the full report for the city & district councils here. The quotation concerned in on p118. What was claimed What actually happened Throughout the early 1980s, the continued decline in the provision of … More What should the role of local historians be in the local planning process?

Cambridge Architect Gordon Logie assesses the need for a new large concert hall. March 1967

We got a refurbished Corn Exchange 20 years later instead. But before I go on… We now have a new political administration in office at Cambridgeshire County Council following the local elections of May 2021. This is the Joint Administration made up of the Liberal Democrats, Labour, and Independent groups, who together have removed the … More Cambridge Architect Gordon Logie assesses the need for a new large concert hall. March 1967

Son of Florence Ada Keynes on the future of the new Arts Council

***Because there’s a local history angle to everything!*** Cambridge-born (and educated, for he was technically both town and gown) economist John Maynard Keynes died an untimely death in 1946 after completing exhaustive negotiations for a post-war loan from the USA in order to avoid financial catastrophe for the UK – exhausted after the Second World … More Son of Florence Ada Keynes on the future of the new Arts Council

The opening of the new Cambridge Corn Exchange – the dedication to the people of Cambridge. November 1875

Before the inaugural concert – and the headline-grabbing disturbances, the borough council held an opening ceremony for the construction of a grand hall that would serve not only as a corn exchange, but also as a concert hall right up to the present day. The building will be 150 years old in 2025 – something … More The opening of the new Cambridge Corn Exchange – the dedication to the people of Cambridge. November 1875

“I want to ride my bicycle – I want to ride it where I like!”

In 1975, Cambridgeshire County Council published a study on cycling in Cambridge. It has been digitised by the Cambridge Cycling Campaign – of which I am a member. You’ll be familiar with Bicycle Race by Queen, who released the track a few years after this report was released. Though I can’t say that it was … More “I want to ride my bicycle – I want to ride it where I like!”

Frida Knight on Vietnam at the time of the Tet Offensive in 1968 – two years before she returned to Cambridge with her husband

Musician, anti-fascist, communist, and peace campaigner Frida Knight (previously Frida Stewart) had long since settled in Reading where her husband Prof Basil Knight worked at Reading University. She penned this piece in the midst of one of the most violent offensives of the Vietnam War. This from the Reading Evening Post in the British Newspaper … More Frida Knight on Vietnam at the time of the Tet Offensive in 1968 – two years before she returned to Cambridge with her husband

The Holford-Wright Maps of the Cambridge Development Plan 1950

I digitised and uploaded one of my original copies to the Internet Archive You can view the maps in Vol 2 here. If you want to read Vol.1, Cambridge City Council have digitised it here. They don’t publicise it though – which is a shame. I remain of the view that the analysis of Cambridge … More The Holford-Wright Maps of the Cambridge Development Plan 1950

Professor Alexander Macalister accuses King’s College of running off with all of the stone from Cambridge Castle. 1895

Prof Macalister from his WikiP page here. He said that King Henry VI gave the College permission to use the stone Prof Alexander Macalister was a long-serving Professor of Anatomy at the University of Cambridge, taking up his appointment in 1883 to 1919, when he died. As with many academics past and present, Prof Macalister … More Professor Alexander Macalister accuses King’s College of running off with all of the stone from Cambridge Castle. 1895

“And we’re gonna party like it’s 1899!”

At a time when Cambridge’s population (less Chesterton) was around 40,000 people, around 1,800 teachers and delegates rocked up to the town for the annual conference of the National Union of Teachers – one of the largest and most respected of the national trade unions in the country at the time. And an exciting time … More “And we’re gonna party like it’s 1899!”